Friday, March 1, 2024

News

MSU

New RHA president shares goals for future

Nick Kovacic’s term as the new president of the Residence Halls Association doesn’t begin until Wednesday, but his goals for the 2001-02 year are ready for action.Among them, Kovacic said he wants students to view RHA as an organization committed to serving and representing them.“If students have issues or concerns about anything, they should be able to come to us,” Kovacic said.

MICHIGAN

E.L. cable service topic of meeting

Although Nick Bofferding and his six roommates split the roughly $50 bill for digital cable each month, the price is still a little high for the mechanical engineering junior. But he doesn’t care. “I’m sure if it were just me paying, I might care more,” he said.

MICHIGAN

Victims remain hospitalized

Hospitality business junior Justin Jones remains in critical condition in the Intensive Care Unit at Lansing’s Sparrow Hospital after being assaulted in East Lansing on Saturday. Jones, a St.

MSU

Model UN educates high-schoolers about world viewpoints

Some of the world’s biggest problems are about to be placed in the hands of high-schoolers.More than 80 students from across the state will participate in MSU’s first Model United Nations conference at the Kellogg Center this weekend.The conference, sponsored by the International Relations Organization, gets under way at 7 p.m.

MICHIGAN

Court places hold on judges U-M decision

DETROIT - A federal appeals court Thursday put on hold a judge’s order that the University of Michigan law school stop using race as a factor in admissions. A three-judge panel of the 6th U.S.

MSU

Debate team excels in national tourney

The Spartan basketball team isn’t the only program at MSU showing consistency in Final Four appearances.Last week, two members from MSU’s debate team reached the semifinals in two National Championship debate tournaments for the second consecutive year.

MSU

Seminar discusses natural resources

Agency executives from around the country made a stop at MSU on Wednesday to discuss the current challenges facing natural resource management in the United States.Nearly 100 people attended the seminar, “Emerging Issues Confronting Natural Resource Agencies in the 21st Century,” in the Communication Arts and Sciences Building.Seven panel members came from as far as Florida, Arizona and Massachusetts, where they are executives of federal or state management and conservation agencies.

MICHIGAN

U grads combine books and beans at coffee shop

LANSING - When Lisa Thompson and Cynthia Pugh met on MSU’s campus as undergraduates almost 20 years ago in Bryan Hall, they never imagined they would one day open a Beaner’s Gourmet Coffee shop in Lansing. But that day came Monday, when the duo opened a cafe in hope to promote intellectual conversations and thinking, inside the Capital Area District Library, 401 South Capital Ave. “It’s been fun and hectic,” said Pugh, an owner of the new coffee shop.

MSU

Grant arrives for clinic in time for tax rush

One campus organization got money from the Internal Revenue Service a little early this year.The MSU-Detroit College of Law Tax and Rental Housing clinics recently received a $100,000 grant from the IRS.“It is funding that is provided for us in order for us to provide the services that we do,” said DCL Professor Michele Halloran, director of the Tax Clinic.Halloran co-wrote and submitted the grant request.

MICHIGAN

Council approves ordinance to limit city building heights, keep downtown skyline

East Lansing may be maturing as an urban area, but it’s not growing up.After more than one year of discussion and planning, the East Lansing City Council approved an ordinance at its Tuesday regular meeting that limits building heights throughout the city.The height limits have been reduced from eight stories, or 14 with a city permit, to four stories, or 10 with a city permit.The ordinance also allows the city council to make exceptions for projects that would be beneficial to the city but require more height.Councilmember Sam Singh said the change would help protect residents living near the downtown from the shadows of tall buildings, while still leaving the city open to new development.“I think the downtown can handle some more considerable heights, especially on the Grand River (Avenue) side, but as soon as you get down around Albert (Avenue), you start to encroach on neighborhoods,” he said.“We’ve had the opportunity to have buildings of considerable size and it just hasn’t happened.”Orilla McHarris, a resident of East Lansing’s Bailey neighborhood since 1965, said she was pleased with the decision to hold on to the small-town atmosphere that can be ruined by tall buildings.“Our neighborhood is generally in favor of keeping the buildings low and letting everybody get some sunshine and fresh air,” she said.

MSU

ASMSUs lack of landlord input leads council to delay ordinance

While the ASMSU landlord-tenant ordinance has East Lansing City Council’s attention, the council’s view on the issue is still unclear.Last week, the undergraduate student government sent a letter to the city council laying out the ordinance’s plan, but East Lansing Mayor Mark Meadows said initial discussion with council members last week hasn’t provided any insight.“I don’t think they have any impression on the ordinance at all,” Meadows said.The ASMSU proposal would prohibit landlords from showing an apartment or home to prospective tenants or forcing renewal of a lease until one-third of the lease has passed.However, at its meeting last week, the council raised concerns about ASMSU’s lack of landlord input and referred to East Lansing city staff as one of the reasons behind the proposal’s delay.When ASMSU officials began working on the ordinance in December, they requested the help of city staff, but said they obtained little results or feedback.“ASMSU could have sent that letter at any point and time,” Councilmember Sam Singh said.

MSU

Ugly Man raises money for cancer

It’s not about the face that breaks the most mirrors on campus, or students who have really low self-esteem.The “Ugly Man” on campus at MSU is cancer - and the purpose of the Ugly Man on Campus contest, sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega and Modern Skate and Surf, is to beat him.The annual contest, which began Monday and ends tonight, hopes to raise as much as $1,000 for the American Cancer Society.Nine contestants paid a $25 entry fee to have their faces posted on brightly colored buckets, each to collect as much pocket change and donations from passersby as possible.Members of Alpha Phi Omega set up tables with the buckets daily from 10 a.m.

MSU

Homecoming committee seeks input for new theme

The members of the MSU Homecoming Committee are searching for a theme for the 2001 homecoming celebration to be held in October. And they want the input of MSU students. Committee member Tami Kuhn, who is also the manager of the Campus Center, said the group saw a need for different input. “One of the things we talked about when we met was getting more student input,” she said.

MSU

Group to model for worker rights

Today Students for Economic Justice will model clothing that sports not the latest fashions - but highlights clothes the group claims are made in factories with unfair working conditions. Student members will walk the runway in the Sweatshop Fashion Show at 12:15 p.m.