Wednesday, August 10, 2022

News

CAMPUS

Enrollment numbers released

A university report released Tuesday shows MSU enrollment at 43,336. The final enrollment tally is only slightly lower than the preliminary data released by university officials late last month.

CAMPUS

Students to vote on tax raise

The Council of Graduate Students will hold a formal vote on their referendum that would increase the tax it charges graduate students.If passed by the graduate student body in the spring, the tax would increase one dollar per semester, from $6.75 to $7.25.The recommendation was passed by the graduate student department representatives and the executive board, the members of COGS that hold voting seats in the council and represent each academic department in the university.

CAMPUS

Students patrol lots, keeping cars safe

Vehicles properly parked overnight in an on-campus lot are still susceptible to break-ins, stolen property and damage to windshields, outside mirrors or doors.What students may not know is that there is something they can do about it, thanks to the MSU police department’s secret weapon - the Lot Watch program.The 10-year-old program, made up of 25 to 30 student volunteers, monitors campus parking lots during nighttime hours to catch criminals in action.“We’re student volunteers who serve as the eyes and ears for the police department and work to combat the crimes that students most often face in the lots,” said criminal justice senior Nick Eisenlohr.

CITY

Council promotes safe drinking

The East Lansing Police Department will not be the only ones regulating the amount of alcohol young adults drink.Bar and restaurant owners in East Lansing and Lansing have joined to form the Responsible Hospitality Council.

CAMPUS

Online evaluations get a second chance

Representatives from ASMSU’s Academic Assembly dodged a procedural bullet to keep alive the possibility of putting SIRS - Student Instructional Ratings System - evaluation forms online.At the Executive Committee of Academic Council meeting Tuesday, an item was placed on the agenda denoting a meeting of the Academic Senate, a group composed entirely of faculty members that supersedes Academic Council, to possibly vote on the SIRS proposal.“(The vote for SIRS) wouldn’t have had student input and that is not good,” said Steve Lovelace, undergraduate diversity division and ECAC representative for academic assembly.The group did not go in session, however, because Lovelace’s motion to cancel an Academic Senate meeting was approved.

CAMPUS

Flu vaccine will be late coming to U

The arrival of flu season means students can use all the help they can get to stay healthy - but that help may be delayed.Vaccinations are usually distributed in late October, but people may have to wait until as late as December to receive a dose because shipments of the vaccine have been held up.

CITY

House cuts costs with laptops

LANSING - Multiply 110 lawmakers by two large boxes of paper a day, and you have a ton of paper.To reduce the amount of paper used, and the associated costs, the Michigan House of Representatives came up with a solution and implemented it with the opening of the fall session in late September.Each representative’s desk on the House floor is now complete with a $2,900 WinBook Pentium III laptop computer.The 110 computers cost nearly $320,000 - and that doesn’t include labor costs and installation fees.

CAMPUS

Peacefest comes to campus

Government spending will be the topic of discussion at the Bread Not Stones Peacefest at the rock on Farm Lane on Wednesday. The event, slated to take place from noon to 3 p.m., will include a 30-minute presentation titled “U Slice the Budget Pie.” It will deal with the extremes of government spending and will include giant inflatable puppets and the “Moneymobile,” which is painted with readings urging the government to invest money in kids. The bus tour is part of Bread Not Stones: A National Catholic Campaign to Redirect Military Spending sponsored by Pax Christi USA.

CAMPUS

U professor recognized nationally

After nearly 30 years at MSU, psychology Professor Bertram Karon is being rewarded.The International Center for the Study of Psychiatry and Psychology presented Karon with its 2000 Award for Contributions to the Ethical Human Sciences and Services last week at a three-day conference in New York.Throughout his career, Karon has been a proponent of psychoanalysis - a method of investigating a patient’s emotional psyche through free association and dream analysis - in place of excessive medication, shock treatment and other methods of treating patients.“There are problems with psychoanalysis - even Freud knew that - but I’ve found it helpful as a theory and as a treatment,” he said.He’s especially noted for his stance against using drugs to treat mental patients.Karon did his undergraduate studies at Harvard University and performed his graduate studies at Princeton University.

CAMPUS

Aussie to speak to U

James Cowan has traveled the world, spending time in the wilds of Borneo, Aboriginal communities in Australia and tribes in North Africa.Now the Australian native will be saying “G’ day” to MSU.The Residential Option in Arts and Letters, a two-year program for freshmen and sophomores from different disciplines in humanities, will be hosting Cowan on Wednesday for a lecture in the Union Gold Room.“He’s imbued with a combination of European and Aboriginal perspectives,” said Arthur Versluis, acting director of the humanities program and associate professor of American Thought and Language.Versluis said Cowan’s speech will focus on the relationship between creativity and spirituality.First published in 1964, Cowan’s work has been translated into dozens of languages.

CAMPUS

Homecoming promises fun

For more than six months, plans for Homecoming 2000 have been built and tweaked to help captivate students, community and alumni.Now, MSU is ready to celebrate.The theme “Champions 2000” reflects the success of the last year and the hope for more in the future, particularly during the Homecoming football game Saturday against the University of Wisconsin Badgers.Keith Williams, executive director of the MSU Alumni Association and a co-chairman of the Homecoming committee, said the week is always fun-filled.“We have raised Homecoming to a new level where it’s very popular,” he said.

CITY

Council to consider transportation merger

The East Lansing City Council will meet tonight to discuss Capital Area Rail Council merging with the Capital Area Transportation Authority. The Rail Council is a group of representatives from the Greater Lansing area who oversee the Amtrak station in East Lansing.

CITY

Student stabbed twice at off-campus party

A 22-year-old East Lansing resident was stabbed while attempting to break up a fight early Sunday morning.Eric Miller, a criminal justice and psychology senior, was stabbed twice in the back by an unidentified male at a party inside a private residence on the 100 block of Gunson Street around 1:15 a.m., said East Lansing police Capt.