Monday, March 4, 2024

News

MICHIGAN

Greeks awarded for efforts

A pair of marketing seniors earned the titles of “Greek Man” and “Greek Woman” for 2001. Jennifer Dirksen, former president of Sigma Kappa sorority, was awarded by the Panhellenic Council for her efforts in her organization.

MICHIGAN

Center to offer new shopping selections

LANSING TWP. - Krystal Teamer shops at Meridian Mall, 1982 W. Grand River Ave. in Okemos, because it is the closest one to MSU’s campus. The criminal justice senior has no car and said Meridian can be easily reached by bus. But next summer, Teamer and other students can enjoy shopping at the Lansing area’s newest shopping center, at the northwest corner of Lake Lansing Road and U.S.

MICHIGAN

Cameras catch motorists running red lights

Red lights, camera, preventative action.A study completed in Oxnard, Calif. by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety this week reported that cameras installed at intersections to catch red-light runners are decreasing the number of collisions and injuries.The institute estimates that more than 800 people are killed and 200,000 injured every year in red - light crashes in the United States.The city of Oxnard placed cameras at 11 of its 125 intersections in 1997.

MSU

Student hopes to educate mentors, others about sedative drugs

Health Advocates at Olin Health Center said there has been an increased number of people asking to be tested for sedative drugs like GHB, known as liquid ecstasy, and Rohypnol, known as roofies.But most tests have come back negative.“This shows there is great concern and even panic when it comes to these drugs,” said Damilola Walker, a human biology and microbiology senior and an Olin Health Advocate.In response to the increased awareness and concern, but also to the misconceptions about the drugs, Walker has started a project to distribute information allowing students to be more educated about the effects of the drugs.Walker will be distributing posters to mentors when students come back in the fall.

MSU

Computer malfunction causes traffic backup

The left lane of South Shaw Lane served as an extension to parking Lot 39 - the pay lot between the International Center and the Engineering Building - on Thursday for more than an hour as cars waited for the lot’s entrance gates to open.An offline computer system resulted in malfunctioning gates and missed appointments.Parking Facilities Supervisor Katherine Mateer said the gates wouldn’t open because of a computer malfunction.

MICHIGAN

LCC inaugurates fourth president

LANSING - More than 300 people attended the inauguration of Lansing Community College’s fourth president, Paula Cunningham, on Thursday at the Lansing Center, 333 East Michigan Ave. “As most of you know, being a community college president was not my plan,” Cunningham said during her inaugural speech.

MSU

Students plan finals strategies

If sunny skies and high temperatures are calling you from your stuffy seat in the library during finals week, maybe you should listen. Health Educator Jonathan Kermiet said students should allow themselves short periods of time during study sessions to relax and regroup mentally. “Give yourself liberty and license to take short breaks,” said Kermiet, who recommends that students take walks, practice breathing exercises or listen to music to relieve stress. “Cramming is not useful - especially if you’re just sitting there for hours.” Students should try to get a full night of sleep before taking tests.

MSU

Sex survey reveals the average person really gets it

The average American has had nine sexual partners in his or her lifetime according to a recent national survey.A telephone poll of 1,000 adults age 18 to 65 was conducted by Adam & Eve, a mail-order erotica distributor, and showed men on average claimed to have had 14 sexual partners while women said they have had five.Elementary education sophomore Keyan MacCune said societal pressures most likely account for the difference between the sexes.“It’s probably because guys embellish and girls aren’t telling the truth,” she said.

MSU

Handbook dispels generational myths

All year long,marketing freshman Matt Horton has been spending about six to eight hours a week on a Student Service Learning Project for his American Thought and Language class, “Writing: Public Life in America.”Horton and his peers from ATL will be honored for work they completed in a handbook to be published this fall, titled “Generation Y Speaks Out, A Public Policy Guide.” The event will take place from 3 p.m to 5 p.m.

MICHIGAN

Community reflects on crime, victims rights

LANSING - Daniel Anderson had good reason to attend the annual Crime Victims’ Rights Awareness Night at the Capitol on Wednesday evening - he survived a blast from a 22-gauge shotgun more than 15 years ago.The Lansing resident, who spent two and a half months in intensive care as a result of his injury, was joined by wife Pat and son Brian to share his story and offer support to other survivors.“We want to give back to the community and try to help victims of violent crime,” he said.As Anderson shared hugs and smiles with other event-goers, he turned the group of seats around him into a community of support.The care of the Lansing Police and the Ingham Regional Medical Center opened Anderson’s eyes to the needs and concerns of violent crime survivors.

MICHIGAN

Education bond incites protest

LANSING - Less than a dozen people gathered on the steps of the Capitol on Wednesday to urge community members to “Vote No May 1” and protest Lansing’s school bond.Although hundreds of community members showed up at previous rallies supporting the $388.5 million school bond, only a handful of residents took a stand against the bond, saying they’ll “Vote No” when the city of 127,000 people sends voters to the polls on May 1.

MSU

Animals offer kids hands-on learning

A rooster crowed in the background as a group of 14 thirdgraders peered at some llamas.“The llama’s fur is really soft,” said third-grader Michael Smalley, while washing the fur off his hands.Michael, a student at Whitehills Elementary School, 621 Pebblebrook St., was one of 2,000 area third-graders participating in Project R.E.D., which stands for Rural Education Day, at the Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education on Wednesday.“It’s fun,” he said.

MSU

Disorder fades with sunlight

Getting out of school soon isn’t the only thing putting people in a better mood lately.There is an expected continual warming period with lots of sunshine between today and the weekend, according to the National Weather Service, and most people would say that news puts them in a better mood - at least to some degree.But there are others who get more serious relief from the sun’s rays beating down for longer periods of time during the day.Seasonal Affective Disorder has serious effects on about 5 percent of the population, according to Dr. Robert Bielski, director of the MSU Winter Depression Clinic.“We think the condition is triggered by the shortening of daylight hours during the winter months,” he said.

MSU

Program offers women a break away from routine

It’s a day that 900 women will come together to learn about and celebrate the melody in their lives.The Kaleidoscope 2001, sponsored by the MSU Alumni Association, takes place today at the Kellogg Center, and includes a luncheon and informational sessions in the morning and early afternoon.The theme, An Aria for Everyone’s Life, will focus on music, health and creativity in women’s lives.Alumni Association member Beverly Carnahan said Kaleidoscope, in its 27th year, was created to provide women an opportunity to break away from normal routines and receive information on health concerns and other issues.“The sessions impact events surrounding women’s day to day lives,” she said.“It’s an excellent day for women to come abreast of current things that may have a bearing on their lives.”And the public has been receptive to the event in the past, Carnahan said.“Kaleidoscope has always been one of our most popular events,” she said.“It’s an outstanding program - every year we’ve been at capacity.”Soprano Roberta Peters is the keynote speaker for this year’s Kaleidoscope, and will perform following the luncheon.Peters is a recipient of the National Medal of Art and the Bolshoi Medal, and has performed all over the world.Alumni Association member Sharon Radtke said the association was looking forward to having a vocalist at Kaleidoscope this year.“We thought is would be fun, and opera is something different,” Radtke said.

MICHIGAN

Lawmakers seek to keep organs in state

The state Legislature may attempt to make it a little easier for Michigan residents in need of a vital organ to receive a transplant.A package of bills was examined by the state House Health Policy Committee this week.

MICHIGAN

Lawmakers consider hate crime legislation

State legislators are trying once again to pass new regulations including the term “sexual orientation” into previous discrimination laws.“This has been proposed before, and we decided we wanted to move it forward,” said Rep.

MSU

Police hope to mend minority relations

MSU police will hold a public forum tonight to discuss the department’s 12-point plan to improve relations with the minority community. The plan, announced in November, addresses racial profiling, supporting minority students in the police department and promoting greater knowledge of police procedures.

MSU

Recreation, food found in morel mushroom picking

Kurt Lamour is a morel mushroom maniac.To him, April is a time to get outdoors and forage through the Michigan foliage to find some tasty fungi.“Mushroom-picking is a tradition that has been passed down in my family from generation to generation,” said Lamour, a botany and plant pathology graduate student.