Friday, February 28, 2020

MSU College Republicans and Democrats, political scientists react to first vice presidential debate

October 5, 2016
Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton, left, and her Vice Presidential running mate Tim Kaine celebrate after her acceptance speech on the final day of the Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016 at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia.  Clinton became the first woman to accept the nomination of a major party for the presidential election.
Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton, left, and her Vice Presidential running mate Tim Kaine celebrate after her acceptance speech on the final day of the Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016 at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. Clinton became the first woman to accept the nomination of a major party for the presidential election. —
Photo by Carly Geraci | and Carly Geraci The State News

The vice presidential debate between Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Gov. Mike Pence (R-Ind.) was held Tuesday night at Longwood University in Farmville, Va.

According to The State News Twitter poll, 64 percent of students believe Kaine won, while 36 percent believe Mike Pence won as of 10 a.m.

“I believe Tim Kaine (won) because he wasn't caught up trying to defend Trump's dangerous rhetoric," president of MSU College Democrats Daniel Eggerding said. "He was able to speak about his and Hillary’s plans."

It was clear the Mike Pence won the debate, vice chair of MSU College Republicans Justin Gould said.

“I think (the vice presidential debate is) unlikely to make much of a difference in people's votes,” director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research Matt Grossmann said. "The main people who are watching would be people who’ve already made up their minds."

People vote for the president, not the vice president, Grossmann said.

But the vice presidency is a position of importance.

"At the end of the day, this position is a heartbeat away from the presidency, and people need to think about that when voting,"  Eggerding said. 

When Americans look at who the vice president nomination is, they see who they are getting on the whole ticket, Gould said.

"Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine showed they lacked the knowledge and accomplishments to lead the nation to greatness," Gould said. "The Trump campaign is grounded and intelligent."

Only 30 percent of the college-aged generation is registered with the Republican Party and that says a lot, Eggerding said.

The debates remain a partisan affair.

"I think it's clear that no matter how the debate went, that the Republicans would say their person won and the Democrats would say their person won," Grossmann said.

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