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Broad Art Museum Yoga event unites East Lansing and MSU yoga participants

July 27, 2014
<p>Musicology graduate student Trevor Nelson practices yoga July 26, 2014, at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum on campus. Yoga instructor Tara Scott has been teaching yoga for eight years. Scott teaches yoga as a way to build community and connection with others.  Corey Damocles/The State News </p>

Musicology graduate student Trevor Nelson practices yoga July 26, 2014, at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum on campus. Yoga instructor Tara Scott has been teaching yoga for eight years. Scott teaches yoga as a way to build community and connection with others. Corey Damocles/The State News

Photo by Corey Damocles | The State News

The Saturday morning yoga session was taught by special guest instructor and Lansing resident Tara Scott, who has been teaching yoga for eight years.

Men and women of all ages and backgrounds listened and followed along as Scott struck a bell to focus the group.

Scott said she aids her students in finding compassion and caters to the abilities of the classes she instructs.

“There’s something in it for everyone,” Scott said. “Just to really touch the Earth ... it’s just a chance to feel like there’s a sense of vastness.”

She believes that by simply being outdoors and being next to someone on a mat garners community and the union that yoga fosters. Scott said her motto is “movement, mindfulness and meditation.”

“I see that as the art of creating skillfulness,” Scott said. “It’s a collective way to generate compassion.”

Second year law student Kate Matych said she likes the idea of being around the art and the people outside of the museum and relaxing during the Broad Art Museum’s yoga sessions.

“It definitely integrates the MSU students with the East Lansing community,” Matych said.

The outdoor event even brought some attendees back into the practice of yoga.

Graduate student Trevor Nelson said he had taken a break from practicing yoga, but came back to it for the event. He said he hoped the people walking on the street would see the class and feel moved to give yoga a try.

“I feel more connected to the people around me,” Nelson said. “To me, it brings a sense of community.”

Scott said every class and every individual has limits with what their body can do.

“You never know what shows up when you are able to kind of just move out your tension and be with your breath,” Scott said.

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