Tuesday, April 23, 2024

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Colleagues mourn professor

People who knew Dr. Joseph A. Papsidero say he’ll always be remembered and respected.Papsidero, a former professor and chairperson of the MSU Department of Community Health Science in the Colleges of Human and Osteopathic Medicine, lost his battle with cancer Monday in Lansing.

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Annual conference concentrates on development of students leadership skills

Hundreds of current and potential leaders will gather on campus this weekend for an annual seminar.The group of MSU and Lansing Community College students will attend the 18th annual MSU Student Leadership Conference in the Business College Complex on Saturday.“This gives students the opportunity to develop their leadership skills,” said Benardo Dargan, a graduate assistant in the office of Leadership Development and Campus Life Orientation.

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Students protest labor conditions at job fair

Some corporate recruiters had a hard time doing their job at Wednesday night’s career fair at the Breslin Student Events Center.Students for Economic Justice, an MSU anti-sweatshop organization, stood in front of the Kohl’s Department Store and Target Corp.

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Psychologist shares mind, body approach to womens health

More than 600 women gathered at Kellogg Center’s Big Ten Room to hear Dr. Joan Borysenko speak about a “mind-body” approach to health.Borysenko, who’s a psychologist and medical scientist, traveled from Colorado to give the annual Centerpoint 2000 lecture.

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NBC health reporter to speak to U

An NBC chief medical and health correspondent will be on campus next week to lecture students.Dr. Bob Arnot, who reports for the network’s “Dateline” and “Today” programs, will speak Tuesday at the Wharton Center’s Pasant Theatre.Arnot was selected by the MSU College of Human Ecology’s Staff Advisory Council to participate in a series of programs designed to highlight issues such as nutrition and dietetics.

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Guest lends advertising industry wisdom

The MSU Department of Advertising has a new face - well, this week it does.Rick Boyko, the high-profile president and chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather in New York, is instructing a class through Thursday this week.The department hosts two visiting professors each year in hopes to give students a new perspective into the advertising industry.“I think this will give students a broader perspective of what the business is really like,” Boyko said.

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Vigil helps remember loved ones

General business sophomore Diana Yacob hasn’t spoken to her grandfather, who lives overseas in Palestine, for more than a month.And she worries that he may be in danger since violence has recently erupted between Israelis and Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.So Yacob, president of MSU’s Arab Student Organization, said she felt it was important to take time to remember her grandfather and others who live, or have died, in the area.“It saddens me that I’m way over here in the United States,” she said.

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Campus unites for United Way charity

The university is lending a hand to United Way, pledging to raise $600,000 for the organization’s 2000 fund-raising campaign. Several different campus-oriented events have already been scheduled to help raise money. The campus-wide effort has benefited the charitable organization for several years, but this year brings about some changes. The leaders of the Capital Area United Way campaign are also leaders at MSU - President M.

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New license plates sport famous Spartan symbol

Soon there will be a little more green on cars driving around campus.Monday morning, Spartan faithful were able to begin purchasing MSU license plates, which feature the famous MSU block “S.”The plates were made for the secretary of state’s “Be True To Your School” promotion.

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Large career fair hits campus Wednesday

More than 180 companies will be on campus Wednesday for the largest career fair at MSU. Students of all majors can attend Career Gallery 2000, “Futures in Focus,” to seek internships, permanent positions or just more career information from a wide range of corporations.

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Fund-raiser has U walking 813 miles

Got running shoes? Residents and staff at Williams and Yakeley Halls better. They plan to walk the equivalent of 31 marathons during the 31 days of October in an effort to raise money for charity. The event, in its second year, was set up to raise funds for MSU Safe Place and the Susan G.

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Second speaker stirs excitement

Campus is buzzing with excitement about the second speaker in the McPherson Professorship coming to campus. MIT Professor Daniel Kleppner, who participated in the invention of the hydrogen laser, will be speaking at the Wharton Center on Wednesday about the impact of quantum physics. “It’s just whoa, big-time crazy stuff,” said Professor Douglas Luckie, who is one of two professors instructing the new Science Changing Society course, the class the professorship is part of.

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Race proves to be fun for all

Dan Lerner had one goal Sunday morning.“I tried not to get passed by anyone running with a baby jogger, even though that did happen,” the Lansing resident said jokingly, shortly after finishing the 15th annual Dinosaur Dash.The 5K race, sponsored by the MSU Federal Credit Union, is held each October and benefits educational programs and exhibits for the MSU Museum.So while Lerner didn’t accomplish his goal, he said he enjoyed supporting the fund-raiser.“It feels great to finish the race,” he said.

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ASMSU to sponsor state House debate

ASMSU, the university’s undergraduate student government, will sponsor the first open debate between state House hopefuls Bill Hollister and Gretchen Whitmer at the Kellogg Center tonight. Democrat Whitmer and Republican Hollister are vying for the 70th District state House seat currently occupied by Laura Baird, D-Okemos.

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Location plays crucial factor in job search

Money isn’t everything - to recent college graduates, at least.A survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers on its Web site, www.jobweb.com, shows a large salary isn’t all that determines what jobs people accept.About 82 percent of the 1,146 people surveyed earlier this year said where the job is located geographically is important to them, while less than 8 percent said location wasn’t a factor at all.Mimi Collins, NACE director of information, said the results were not a surprise.