Thursday, February 27, 2020

Intoxication, speed and scooters: a recipe for injury

October 18, 2019
<p>Lime scooters are back on campus, with over 300 green-accented e-vehicles in the Lansing and East Lansing areas. </p>

Lime scooters are back on campus, with over 300 green-accented e-vehicles in the Lansing and East Lansing areas.

Photo by Lauren DeMay | The State News

Scooters arrived in East Lansing and Michigan State's campus this fall, and some students have already been injured.

Three to four scooter-related incidents have occurred each week so far, said Lansing Urgent Care Dr. Cheryl Elfring.

"A good majority of them are actually head injuries," said Dr. Elfring.

Face lacerations, shoulder injuries and wrist fractures are common injuries, Elfring said.

Elfring said scooter speed and intoxication commonly correlate with scooter-related urgent care visits.

One serious injury received a response from the East Lansing Police Department.

One individual rode a scooter while intoxicated and fell off, severely injuring themselves. "He was not charged with operating while intoxicated," said ELPD Deputy Chief Steve Gonzalez. "Although he could have been under the circumstances of how that played out."

“We encourage people to not drink and scoot,” said Gotcha CEO Sean Flood while demonstrating the scooters in September.

Flood said hours of operation could be adjusted if injury reports become excessive.

She said few patients with injuries wore helmets, which assist in reducing head injuries in the event of an accident.

Michigan State University Police do not have any injury reports, according to Captain Doug Monette.

Monette said four scooters have been impounded on campus so far, which is about 96 less than at this time last year.

Discussion

Share and discuss “Intoxication, speed and scooters: a recipe for injury” on social media.