Monday, September 20, 2021

Greek community members discuss “living in”

February 20, 2012
Sorority sisters advertising sophomore Emily Jaslove, left, and marketing junior Amanda Stowers both live at the Chi Omega sorority house because they wanted a more intimate living setting. "I like that there are people around all the time. In the dorms there are a lot of people you don't know, but here I live with 47 of my best friends," Jaslove said. Derek Berggren/The State News
Sorority sisters advertising sophomore Emily Jaslove, left, and marketing junior Amanda Stowers both live at the Chi Omega sorority house because they wanted a more intimate living setting. "I like that there are people around all the time. In the dorms there are a lot of people you don't know, but here I live with 47 of my best friends," Jaslove said. Derek Berggren/The State News —
Photo by Derek Berggren | and Derek Berggren The State News

When Emily Jaslove first came to MSU in 2010, she wanted to become a part of something special in a campus flowing with more than 45,000 students.

To fulfill this desire, the advertising sophomore said she decided to go out on a whim and joined the Chi Omega sorority, 229 Burcham Drive, which she now calls home for the 2011-12 academic year.
“I love the house — it’s huge and gorgeous,” Jaslove said.

Jaslove said members living in the Chi Omega house are provided with two meals a day during the week, a cleaning service, access to laundry facilities at no charge, a location close to campus and constantly surrounded by more than 45 close friends also living in the house.

Jaslove said she pays about $3,700 per semester to live in the house.

Although there are some downfalls to living in a sorority house, such as limited parking, unavoidable drama between friends and house rules that all members must abide by, Jaslove said the pros outweigh the cons.

“I love living in the house and I feel that it has created a great environment for me to grow,” Jaslove said. “It has honestly been amazing … it is quite an experience that you can’t get anywhere else.”

Alpha Kappa Psi president and finance senior Drew Martin said he joined a fraternity to set himself up to succeed in the business world and surround himself with like-minded people who are going through similar experiences.

As president, Martin said he is required to live in the Alpha Kappa Psi house, located at 123 Louis St., where he pays approximately $1,600 per semester for his own space — which consists of a private bedroom, living room, kitchen and bathroom.

“It’s an affordable way to live compared to some of the apartments close to campus,” Martin said.

Alpha Kappa Psi, also known as the business fraternity, is unique since it is a coed fraternity, giving members a much more diverse experience, Martin said.

“Overall, it’s been good,” Martin said. “It’s a fun experience and one that’s not very expensive.”

MSU Interfraternity Council president and computer science junior Devin Cudnohufsky said living in sorority or fraternity houses is a great way for members of the greek community to experience membership to the full potential.

“I would definitely recommend (living in),” Cudnohufsky said. “It has helped put things in perspective and has been a great experience overall.”

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