Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Opinion

OPINION

MEAP mishap

The Michigan Educational Assessment Program test is used to measure the success of high school students and school districts, but it may be driving schools to cheat to gain the desired results. State Treasurer Doug Roberts released a list of 71 Michigan schools under investigation for possible cheating on the MEAP test. The investigation comes after essay answers from eight students from the same school were found to be suspiciously close. These allegations have angered many superintendents and caused teachers to question what they can and can’t do to prepare the students for the test. Teachers are given answers to the questions before the test is given out and they format their teaching of the material accordingly.

OPINION

Profusion of pretense disgusts columnist

A year ago, I wrote a piece describing my intense hatred of bumper stickers. I thought my arguments were compelling and irrefutable, but it seems that I would have done more for the cause if I had tied my column around a dog’s neck, shot the dog and set it on fire.

OPINION

Borderline

Increased security along the U.S.-Mexico border isn’t the right way to go about handling immigrants. U.S.

OPINION

Anxiety felt by children easily misunderstood

Nothing is worse than losing a parent, especially one who is the family’s foundation. Such was the case with the McGuckins of Idaho, who clearly fell apart after the death of Michael McGuckin, husband of JoAnn McGuckin and the father of seven children, ranging from 8 to 19 years old.The McGuckins were an independent family that believed in sticking together.Living in abject poverty for more than a decade, the family could outlast any member on the “Survivor” series with the skills it acquired.

OPINION

Good example

Every vote counts, doesn’t it? When we walk away from the polls, we expect that our vote is tallied along with the rest and if it isn’t, somebody should find out why. The U.S.

OPINION

Congress, Court wrong to overrule voters

I’m not going to talk about marijuana. I’m going to talk about the cannabis plant, known as a superior medicine since the world’s first medical text, the Pen Ts’ao by Emperor Shen Nung, was written in China 5,000 years ago.

OPINION

Blind decision

The College of Education’s decision to freeze admissions to the special education visual impairment program is disagreeable and detrimental to the college and the university. Administrators from the college and university have placed a hold on admissions for new students after the recent resignation of Professor Susan Bruce, essentially the program’s leader. The visual impairment specialty includes deaf blind, visual impairment and orientation and mobility education and is only one of two visual impairment programs in the state. There are currently about 30 students involved in the program, who have been assured they will be able to graduate with degrees in special education visual impairment. The National Federation for the Blind is planning to sponsor a rally June 8 in front of the Administration Building to support the program. A $1.5 million grant intended for recruitment was recently awarded to the department, but may be in danger if the program doesn’t have enough students, Bruce said. This is a terrible time to put a hold on admissions.

OPINION

Americas greed means drain on energy supply

A couple of weeks ago, in the midst of President Bush’s attempt to push a solution to the energy crisis on the rest of the country, his adviser, Ari Fleisher, made one of the most completely stupid statements I’ve ever been privileged to hear from a supposedly intelligent person.“The president believes that (high-energy consumption) is an American way of life, and that it should be the goal of policymakers to protect the American way of life.

OPINION

Republicans care about our country

I’m writing in response to the column about young Republicans on campus. I would just like to make a few points about the Republican Party and its members, which Ryan Weltzer brought up (“Writer puzzled by political views of peers,” SN 5/30). I have been a Republican for my whole life, which is undoubtedly influenced by my parents.

OPINION

Journalists only give liberal views

Ryan Weltzer’s gentle perplexion at the possibility of conservative thinking amongst his peers may amply demonstrate the answer to the very question he presents (“Writer puzzled by political views of peers,” SN 5/30). It is not surprising in the least that he should be a journalism major, given the admission of his political orientation.

OPINION

Bushs energy crisis is a blessing in disguise

The Bush administration’s current heralding of an energy crisis is right on target. There is obviously an energy shortage, because, seriously, who would ever fabricate such a crisis for purely political and economic gain?

OPINION

No good to go

While it is unfortunate the L.A. Globe nightclub is being forced to shut down because of liquor law violations and numerous police calls, the three owners of the club should try to clean up their establishment and get it back in business. The Lansing City Council voted in March to block renewal of the club’s liquor license.

OPINION

Writer puzzled by political views of peers

What is it that makes young people conservative? I’ve had many arguments with young Republicans who have perfectly legitimate political arguments, but I still can’t understand what makes them conservative. Like many young people, I was initially influenced by my parents’ values.