Saturday, June 6, 2020

News | Campus

CAMPUS

DCL discusses controversial Proposal 1

The MSU-Detroit College of Law held a forum earlier this week to discuss Proposal 1 - which, if approved, would grant parents with children in faltering school districts vouchers to send their children to nonpublic schools. Voters will decide whether to support the state ballot proposal in November’s general election. Sponsored by the Law Review of DCL, the forum focused on the legal and constitutional ramifications of the proposal, specifically whether it would be a violation of the separation of church and state if the voucher was used to send a student to a religious private school. Dissenters insist the proposal is unconstitutional because it takes public tax dollars and invests them in private, and potentially religious, schools. The proposal would grant vouchers to parents with children attending school districts where graduation rates are less than two-thirds. “This is about exploring significant issues in education,” said Peter Koulik, co-chairperson of Wednesday’s voucher forum and note and comment editor for the Law Review. The Law Review is a student-edited academic publication dedicated to the advancement of discussion on timely legal issues. Richard D.

CAMPUS

Byrum visits U, addresses voter registration bill

Dianne Byrum’s weekly coffee hours aren’t what they used to be. But MSU’s representative in the state Senate has never been involved in one of the nation’s most heated congressional races either.Casual gatherings that used to draw only a handful of constituents now lure voters by the dozens - most who are looking to hear what Byrum, D-Onondaga, plans to do if she lands a job in Washington, D.C., come this November.On Thursday, a student-dominated group of about 40 and reporters from The Washington Post and The New York Times gathered at the Union to hear why Byrum thinks she’s more qualified than her opponent, fellow state Sen.

CAMPUS

On-campus parking violators may face rise in fines

Those who choose to park illegally on campus might soon face heftier fines if the All-University Traffic Committee deems them necessary.The AUTC appointed three subcommittees on Thursday to deal with issues concerning parking, parking violations and pedestrian right of way.Each committee consists of faculty members, undergraduate students, graduate students, MSU officials and various other on-campus departments including Campus Park and Planning and the Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities.

CAMPUS

U research plays part in better drug development

Aspirin’s been a staple item in backpacks, purses and medicine cabinets for years, and is said to reduce the risk of heart attacks and ease pain.But 15 years of research by MSU scientists has led to a better understanding of a crucial protein - prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase 1, or PGHS-1 - targeted by aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and naproxen.Armed with understanding of how these drugs interact with PGHS-1, scientists may be able to develop drugs that better target specific diseases.The research, conducted by William Smith, chairperson of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Michael Garavito, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, is detailed in the Sept.

CAMPUS

Forum to address sweatshops

Students for Economic Justice, a campus fair labor organization, will host a public forum Monday night focusing on sweatshops in Nicaraguan factories contracted by Kohl’s Department Store and Target Corp. The factories are currently under scrutiny by the National Labor Committee for firing workers who were attempting to organize unions. Charles Kernigahn, who has fought sweatshops worldwide and is the NLC’s executive director, will speak at the forum.

CAMPUS

Committee to review on-campus parking

The All-University Traffic Committee plans to hold a meeting today to discuss proposed on-campus parking and violation changes. Kay Rout, chairperson of the committee, said the changes could greatly affect students, faculty, staff, visitors and retirees. The committee is expected to discuss the cost of parking fines as well as several other issues, although no decisions are expected to be made. “We’re now asking for changes that are overdue,” said Rout, an American thought and language professor. The committee also could discuss a proposed campaign to promote pedestrian right-of-way and the introduction of a geographic information system - a computerized map that could be used to point out specific parking areas. Fred Poston, assistant vice president for finance and operations, will also be at the meeting to share his views on campus parking. The committee is made up of faculty members, undergraduate students, graduate students, officials and various other on-campus departments including Campus Park and Planning and the Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities.

CAMPUS

Theater to curb crowding problems

More than 1,000 people were turned away from renowned Harvard Professor Stephen Jay Gould’s guest lecture earlier this month because the Wharton Center’s Pasant Theatre was filled to capacity. University officials say that won’t happen again. The second of five lectures for the McPherson Professorship lecture series has been moved from the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center to prevent overcrowding. Depending on the turnout, Daniel Kleppner’s speech Wednesday will either be held at the Pasant Theatre or the much larger Wharton Center Great Hall.

CAMPUS

Campus Fest offers free fun

Krysten McCully didn’t know she’d spend part of her day rolling around inside a human-sized bowling ball after class Tuesday afternoon.But that was just one activity she and many other students enjoyed at the Sports Illustrated Campus Fest, which will continue today behind the rock on Farm Lane.“This whole thing is really great,” McCully, a pre-vet freshman, said.

CAMPUS

RHA, McPherson meet to discuss greenhouse plans with students

The Residence Halls Association will hear both sides of a debate about plans for a proposed student greenhouse at its general assembly meeting today.The meeting will be in the Essex Underground of Wilson Hall at 7 p.m.RHA pledged support for a student project last year in an effort to replace a greenhouse taken down in 1998.The project received approval from the university, but was amended later.

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Log rolls off shelves

Rianne Jones says she never thought distributing 25,000 copies of the Red Cedar Log was beyond reach.“I was really confident,” said Jones, Red Cedar Log editor in chief.

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Campus Fest brings much activity to U

For the next two days, students can do something other than study between classes.And students could also be coming home after their classes with more than just books.The Sports Illustrated Campus Fest returns today to MSU with its full array of exhibits, games, sporting activities, sweepstakes and free stuff.

CAMPUS

Report to offer area students job info

Students looking to embark on a new career after graduation will soon have an additional resource available to them, thanks in part to the university. The MSU Career Services & Placement will offer a report Wednesday that some say will help make students aware of more career opportunities available in the Lansing and East Lansing area. Lansing’s office of Manpower Inc., the largest staffing firm in the world, will release the report, which was researched and designed by two MSU students.

CAMPUS

Trustees elect new chairperson

AUGUSTA, Mich. - Colleen McNamara, a five-year veteran of MSU’s governing body, was elected chairperson of the university’s Board of Trustees on Friday. McNamara, who joined the board in 1995, replaces former Trustee Bob Traxler, who resigned in August to accept a position on the Mackinac Island State Parks Commission. “It’s really an honor,” McNamara said Friday.