Thursday, February 22, 2024

Life

STUDENTS

Future Black educators at MSU navigate careers as education becomes politicized

Since 2021, 44 states have taken steps to restrict the teaching of critical race theory, as well as discussions of racism and sexism in classrooms, according to data from Education Weekly. 18 states have either signed these restrictions into law or approved similar actions. Black teacher education freshman Ferguson said these attacks on Black history affect both her identity and future profession. At the same time, they make her motivation to become a teacher stronger.

COMMUNITY

Black representation among faculty is vital to student belonging, success, students say

“Having a professor that looks like you is important because it shows what’s possible and it, at times, can provide a sense of belonging, where you’re not feeling isolated,” Sheri Lewis, an assistant professor in the Department of African American and African Studies, said. “You see there’s someone that looks like you, (and) possibly have (a) similar background as you, it can be motivating and inspiring and provides a sense of hope and belonging.”

COMMUNITY

MSU historian talks Malcolm X's Lansing years

When local history often gets lost in the textbooks, it’s important to call to mind the icons who walked the same streets we do every day, including Malcolm X, one of the most prominent figures of the civil rights movement. Malcom X grew up in Lansing, Michigan. Arts and humanities professor John Aerni-Flessner focused his curriculum on Malcom X and his time in Lansing within his teaching career at MSU. 

EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Healing Through Kindness & Service Event creates reflective, community spaces for Spartans

Students, faculty, staff and community members gathered at the International Center on Michigan State University's campus and the Hannah Community Center in East Lansing to participate in the Healing Through Kindness and Service Event on Feb. 13. The event, meant to help the Spartan community heal and process on the one year anniversary of the mass shooting on MSU’s campus, was organized by Associated Students of Michigan State University, or ASMSU, and the Center for Community Engaged Learning, or CCEL.

STUDENTS

MSU Memorial Tree honors shooting victims, students who died during academic year

A year after the February 13th shooting, only one permanent memorial honoring the students who were killed graces Michigan State University’s campus – the 2022-23 Student Memorial Tree. Data science sophomore Clara Linjewile believes the university should work with the families of the students who passed away to truly honor their lives. “Given the context of how they passed away, I feel like their lives should just be honored in a more significant way,” Linjewile said.