Thursday, February 9, 2023

News

CITY

GOP retains majority in Michigan House

Things weren’t looking good for the state House Republicans vying to keep their 58-52 majority over the Democrats.But after Tuesday’s election, the GOP prevailed - the Republicans still have 58 representatives in the House and none of the party’s incumbents, who weren’t term-limited, lost.Kendall Wingrove, press secretary for House Republican Communications, said winning the House majority has not been easy.“We worked extremely hard for two years in preparation for this election,” Wingrove said.

CAMPUS

Group protests U subcontractor

Several local members of the Michigan Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ Union formed a picket line Thursday in front of the Human Ecology Building. The group, which also picketed Wednesday, is protesting low wages and poor working conditions for nonunion workers by an MSU subcontractor, J & S Plastering. “We will be out here until this is resolved, but I don’t see it getting resolved today,” said Greg Brisboy, a business agent and full-time representative for Local 16 of the Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ Union in Lansing. Nonunion employees are currently earning an hourly wage of $12, Brisboy says, which is $10 lower than the wage earned by area union members.

CITY

Greeks to choose delegates

At 6 p.m. on Nov. 15, the greek system will hold elections for representatives of the Interfraternity Council, in the Union Gold Room and Panhellenic Council, in the Union Parlors B and C.Tiffany Finlan, Panhellenic president, said it’s important to select a strong individual who will be able to carry on responsibilities of such a large organization.“I hope that whomever is elected will take the traditions that we have established and work to build on them,” she said.The Panhellenic and Interfraternity councils are looking for presidents and vice presidents for many greek areas and activities.There are three candidates running for Panhellenic president.Emily Crandell, a general management senior, said she is running because the greek system has given so much to her, she’d like to give something back.“I have a million ideas,” Crandell said.

CAMPUS

Institute director calls new job a perfect position

For Carol Weissert, being the director of the university’s Institute for Public Policy and Social Research is an ideal situation.“It’s a perfect position because it pulls together people who are interested in public policy,” said Weissert, currently the director of MSU’s Program in Public Policy and Administration.

CITY

Officials ask residents to keep leaves out of street

With the peak season for autumn leaves drawing near, Lansing city officials want to make sure residents know how to dispose of their leaves.It’s illegal to dump leaves in what is called the right of way, said Steve Chalker, the recycling coordinator and supervisor of the right of way enforcement officers for the city’s Public Service Department.

CITY

Sting targets video games

Minors can’t buy cigarettes, pornography or alcohol - and now the state is trying to ensure they can’t buy violent video games either.An initiative introduced by Michigan Attorney General Jennifer Granholm on Thursday morning encourages retailers to enact regulations preventing minors from purchasing mature video games.The Entertainment Software Review Board has a system to rate games on a scale similar to movies.

CAMPUS

Freshman council adopts service program

ASMSU’s Freshman Class Council wanted to do something different this year. Hence the reason members agreed to organize “Adopt-a-Child,” a new program established within ASMSU, the university’s undergraduate student government. “We started the year thinking of something to do that would be different from any other class,” said Sarah Kane, a council representative and a member of its community service committee. In the newly founded program, the council has sent letters to more than 60 local businesses asking for donations of money and toys to ensure a happy holiday for several underprivileged children in the East Lansing area. “We sent letters to anyone we thought would be interested,” Kane said. This is the first year ASMSU has attempted such a program, and one representative said he thinks it’s about time the student government do so. “I think ASMSU needs to do things for the community and give things back to the children,” said Quinn Wright, a College of Communication Arts and Sciences representative on the Student Assembly. Wright built a foundation of the idea from a similar program - which also carries the same name - he participated in during his senior year at Ferndale High School in Ferndale, Mich. “It’s a great program, so I thought, ‘Why not?’” Wright said.

CAMPUS

U looking for a few good minority aides

The Office of Minority Student Affairs has begun its minority aide selection process for the 2001-2002 academic year. Murray Edwards, the university’s senior coordinator for Minority Student Affairs, said minority aides play a crucial role for minority students living in residence halls. “Minority aides are undergraduate racial or ethnic students that live in the residence hall and are there to assist students in their transition to MSU by being a resource person for those students,” Edwards said. Minority aides often assist with students’ problems, issues and concerns by referring them to the proper resources on campus, he said. Candidates for the job must participate in a three-part process.

CAMPUS

Trustees retain seats in close contest

Scott Romney and Dorothy Gonzales will continue their tenures as MSU trustees.With 99 percent of the precincts reported Wednesday, Democrat Gonzales led with 25 percent of the vote and Republican Romney had garnered 24 percent in the race for two seats.Former Lt.

CAMPUS

Mural adds color, life to hall

Agriculture Hall has a new gem welcoming people into its atrium.The atrium connects the part of Agriculture Hall built in 1909 to the new annex of the building, which was completed earlier this year.A mural, “ANR Past, Present and Future” hangs in the atrium.

CITY

Whitmer beats GOP rival

In a state House contest predicted by many to be hotly contested, Democrat Gretchen Whitmer handily beat her GOP rival Bill Hollister.The winner of the 70th District state House seat said she’s going to focus on getting situated with her new job for the next couple of months.After a long night of no sleep, Whitmer finally saw the numbers of her victory against Hollister.

CITY

Celebrities show election involvement

Stars of television, film and stage may not have enough political knowledge to run the government, but they do know where to put their famous faces - and their money - to help impact elections. “They’re pretty busy with their show business careers, but politics are so important to them,” said Charles Atkin, an MSU communication professor who teaches a course dealing with media coverage of campaigns.

CITY

Fraternity participates in food drive

For some needy families, a little food can go a long way. The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity’s North American Food Drive philanthropy is accepting monetary and food donations this week to benefit underprivileged families in the area. Paul Mitchell, fraternity member and Interfraternity Council President, said every dollar raised will equal 8 pounds of food for the people who need it most. “We have gone to local businesses, fraternities, sororities, the dorms and residences in East Lansing, Lansing and Okemos to ask if they’d like to donate,” Mitchell said.

CAMPUS

Caucus creates resource group

A new caucus group hopes to diminish feelings of isolation for black students living off campus.The MSU University Apartment Black Caucus Association was started after several students received an e-mail asking if anyone would be interested in starting a black caucus for university apartment residents.Kellie Howard, a psychology senior and Spartan Village resident, was one of the first to respond.Howard, the acting vice president for the newly formed caucus, said though university apartment residents founded the group, she hopes the caucus will become a resource for all black students living outside of the residence halls.“At least being in the dorms, you have the support of MAs, the RAs and the caucus,” Howard said.