Saturday, May 21, 2022

News

CAMPUS

VOX using voices to increase awareness

A new student group, VOX, which is Latin for “voices,” is planning to educate students about reproductive health. “We hope to spread awareness and to get people politically active,” said Kathryn Paquette, co-director of the group.

CAMPUS

Live miracles wow fair crowds

Detroit - Screams from nearby carnival rides and smells of cotton candy gave way to wide-eyed youngsters witnessing more than 400 live animal births at the Miracle of Life exhibit at the Michigan State Fair during the last two weeks. MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine staffed and sponsored the Miracle of Life exhibit for the eighth year in a row. Calves, lambs, piglets and poultry are born and spend the first days of their lives under the big white tent, just off the midway. Kaylene Cipolla was one of roughly 500 people at the exhibit Monday, the fair’s final day.

CITY

Student senate offers textbook exchange

Students looking for a deal might find a book exchange has a very affordable price. The books are free. The James Madison College Student Senate has a book exchange at the beginning of every semester.

CAMPUS

ASMSU fights for future of program

One of the best visually impaired programs in the nation was placed under a moratorium, and ASMSU representatives are fighting to keep it running.In June, the College of Education’s visual impairment program, which includes hearing and mental disabilities, was put on a year long hiatus while university officials review the program.The freeze on the program was preceded by the resignation of one of its leaders, Susan Bruce, an assistant professor of counseling educational psychology & special education for nine years.

CITY

Welcome Week celebrations quieter police say

East Lansing is seeing a downturn in partying.MSU and East Lansing police said Welcome Week celebrations and parties have become increasingly quieter, with fewer arrests and fewer problems.“It was extremely noticeable,” said MSU Sgt.

CAMPUS

History professor fondly remembered by students, colleagues

An MSU history professor and avid skydiver, David Walker, died earlier this summer in a sky diving accident.Peter Beattie, a fellow Latin American historian at MSU, said Walker was born in Louisiana but spent much of his life in Texas.“David was a real character,” said Beattie, an associate history professor.

CAMPUS

Llamas invade campus for Labor Day

What animal is an ideal backyard companion, requires little maintenance and doesn’t smell or make annoying noises? They’re llamas, and they’re invading campus this weekend. Up to 200 of the cute creatures can be seen at Llamafest, set for 8 a.m.

CITY

Officers hope to better serve student groups

East Lansing Sgt. Nancy Hamilton spent eight of her 11 years with the East Lansing Police Department working with the canine patrol. Now she’s handling a completely different kind of animal - students. On top of her regular road-patrol duties, Hamilton will serve as the student alliance coordinator, a position created to improve relations between MSU students and police. “This is to try to get students familiar with officers,” Hamilton said.

CITY

U aids in research for online resource

Students of all ages will benefit from the creation of “Michigana,” a proposed online encyclopedia of Michigan history and culture. The Michigan Humanities Council announced Monday that Dr. Nancy Nelson Knupfer was hired as the project planning director for the encyclopedia, which will be launched in about a year. A $50,000 grant was awarded to the council for the project from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

CAMPUS

Increase helps professors pay remain competitive

The university’s academic staff will notice an increase in their pay checks this October, but reactions amongst the faculty are mixed as to whether the increase will move MSU’s historically underpaid professors up the Big Ten’s salary scale.MSU ranked last in the Big Ten in average salary during the last school year, the Office of Planning and Budgets said.This year, the university increased salaries by 5 percent for the third year in a row, despite a lower than expected state appropriation.And MSU President M.

CAMPUS

Trees: tailgaters dont tread on me

The grass in Spartan Stadium will be growing green next fall, but after football season, the soil all over the rest of campus could be as hard as concrete.To prevent the demise of campus greenery, MSU officials are prohibiting parking on any grass surface north of the Red Cedar River, leaving parking areas on south campus designated for gamegoers.“Over six football games a year, and especially when it’s wet, it would continue to cause the trees to go into a decline,” said Paul Swartz, the campus arborist in charge of tree maintenance.

CAMPUS

Financial aid takes to Web; New system goes paper-free

Financial aid applicants no longer have to sign, seal and deliver their forms. Seeking assistance is as simple as a click away. Students have used the Internet for several months, but for the first time, the entire system is paperless, said Keith Williams, assistant director of the Office of Financial Aid. “From the beginning to the end, students can complete the financial aid process,” he said.

CITY

Bacteria could have tainted beef in many U freezers

The recall of more than 530,000 pounds of possible E. coli-tainted beef by the American Foods Group on Monday may worry some Lansing residents, but there are many precautions they can take to ensure infected meat is not eaten.The recalled beef, which was found to have E.

CITY

Click it or Ticket this Labor Day weekend

MSU police are planning to buckle down on drivers who don’t buckle up. Just in time for Labor Day travel, the Department of Police and Public Safety is participating in the statewide Click it or Ticket campaign, putting more emphasis on safety belt wearing. “We do it all the time, but we’ll be giving it special attention,” said MSU police Sgt.

CAMPUS

Disease threatens U.S. blood supply; increase in donations needed from U

Mad Cow disease is expected to take a toll on blood donations this year, and the American Red Cross is asking for students’ help.Following the outbreaks of the disease in Europe, a blood shortage is expected because of precautions to prevent the disease from spreading into the United States.“We will lose between six-to-eight percent this year because people who have traveled to the UK could have come in contact with the Mad Cow disease and not know it,” said Carol Lovelady, a donor recruitment representative for MSU with the American Red Cross, 1800 E.