Saturday, September 26, 2020

News

CAMPUS

U researchers investigate corn spacing, create adaptive equipment

MSU crop and soil science professors are researching what may be the wave of the future for growing corn.Kurt Thelen, professor of crop and soil sciences, has been researching the effects of growing corn in narrow 15-inch rows in comparison to the traditional 30-inch rows that many farmers around the country employ.The study began in 1997.“Historically it’s always been the planting implements that spaced rows of corn,” Thelen said.

CAMPUS

Minority speaker series to host civil rights activists

Four theologians who experienced the American Civil Rights Movement firsthand will bring their stories and perspectives to MSU for Black History Month, which starts Thursday. The speakers will come to campus as part of the Visiting Minority Lecture Series titled “Slavery to Freedom: An American Odyssey.” The series is presented by MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and is a joint effort by the university and the state of Michigan to increase MSU’s minority faculty pool without hiring lecturers full-time. “This allows us to tap our resources nationwide to bring speakers to campus and make them more accessible to students and faculty,” said Sandy Kilbourn, the college’s executive director for external programs. Kicking off the series will be the Rev.

CITY

Number of flu cases to increase

The flu has been slowly making its rounds and the worst may still be on the way. Last year influenza reached its height in December, but this year the bug has been delayed throughout the nation, including Michigan, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The flu causes 20,000 deaths and 110,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. English freshman Allyson Stanley had the flu during winter break, but didn’t go to the doctor. “I figured if it ended within a day, then I wouldn’t go, but if it persisted, I would go to the doctor,” she said.

CAMPUS

HealthTeam values new leader

Margaret Knapp said she is excited about the possibilities her new position with the MSU HealthTeam will offer.Knapp was appointed as the chief operating officer of the MSU HealthTeam in October, and she said she is hoping to move it forward.“This is a dynamic environment with extreme potential,” Knapp said.The team provides medical care to students and the public and includes the MSU College of Human Medicine, the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine, the MSU College of Nursing, Olin Health Center and clinical offices throughout the Lansing area.Before coming to MSU, Knapp spent 20 years in the U.S.

CITY

Restaurants seek permit for dance floors

East Lansing businesses want to give residents a place to put their feet up, and kick their feet up.Two downtown restaurants have requested the entertainment license required to have a dance floor: Troppo, 213 Ann Street, and Spartan Sports Den, 1227 E.

CAMPUS

Grant aids study of tourism

Tropical vacations of the future may take on a new meaning for tourists.MSU Professor of Anthropology Laurie Medina plans to study a new trend in travel - but she’s not headed to the popular Cancun or Jamaica mainstays.She recently received a $74,940 grant, which she’ll use on an 8-month excursion to Belize where she’ll study “eco-tourism.”The concept defines a type of adventure travel emphasizing tourists’ social responsibility when visiting parts of the developing world.“It’s a fairly new idea over the last decade,” Medina said.

CAMPUS

Evening College offers unique classes, less stress

Students and community members looking for enrichment will find offerings this spring at MSU’s Evening College, which opened registration Wednesday.The Evening College, a division of the MSU Alumni Association, aims to provide continuing education for adults, but gives students an opportunity at evening and weekend activities.“I believe in lifelong education for adults,” said Louise Cooley, director of the Evening College.Cooley said most participants are looking to continue their education in a leisurely, low-stress environment.

CAMPUS

Senior to study in Ireland

Kathleen Romig will be getting a little overseas culture next year. Romig, a social relations senior, will spend next year studying in Ireland as part of the George J.

CITY

Charles Street to close Monday

East Lansing city officials will close Charles Street on Monday near the City Center Project so that construction on the project can continue. The crane being used to build the parking structure for the $35 million project will be moved onto Charles Street, forcing East Lansing to close the area between Grand River Avenue and Albert Avenue. Lori VanOmmeran, a city urban planner and community analyst, said the street will re-open by the end of March.

CAMPUS

Office gets new director

After 21 years, Career Services & Placement has an opening for a new director. Stepping in while the search is on to fill Vernicka Tyson’s place as interim director is Phil Gardner. “I am excited about this,” Gardner said.

CITY

Energy company to raise rates

Escalating costs are forcing gas-provider Consumers Energy Co. to seek rate increases that would cost students and area residents several hundred more dollars per year for natural gas. If the Michigan Public Service Commission approves, Consumers Energy bills could increase between 40 percent and 60 percent April 1.

CAMPUS

LBGT hosts information gala

A purple cow will be found on the fourth floor of the Union this weekend - but most people won’t consider it a strange occurrence. The Alliance of Lesbian-Bi-Gay and Transgendered Students will host its Purple Cow Soiree Sunday starting at 5 p.m.

CITY

Airfare prices increase

When Hester Hughes travels by air she chooses to fly out of Capital City Airport. But a hike in airfare may have Hughes to question that decision next time.“I use Lansing because it is more convenient, once I flew out of Detroit, it was more of a problem with the traffic, frustration and a great inconvenience,” the human ecology graduate student said.“I am hesitant to make travel plans because the increase in airfare.”Some fares on flights departing from the Lansing airport have rose since American Eagle Airlines stopped serving Lansing in May, Deputy Executive Director Mike Lynn said.The increase in prices and a lower number of flights have caused airport travelers to decline by 10 percent in 2000 compared to 1999, he said.“(American Eagle) fares made this market competitive,” Lynn said.American Eagle was second the second largest carrier out of Lansing before their departure - Northwest is the first.“We expect that right now they are going to Flint, Grand Rapids and some to Detroit.