Sunday, May 22, 2022

News | Campus

CAMPUS

Invention contends in market

The engineers at MSU’s Cyclotron building don’t get a three week vacation during the holidays; they’re always working - and thinking. Steve Bricker is no exception. Bricker graduated from MSU in 1981 and has been an engineer in the Cyclotron lab ever since.

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Olin offers solutions for finals week stress

Christmas came early for the Ingham County Health Department. After almost three months of waiting, the health department received its first shipment of the flu vaccine late last week. And although it’s late in the flu season, the vaccinations can still be effective, Ingham County Disease Control Supervisor Judy Williams said. “We go by confirmed cases where someone shows up in the emergency room and has a throat culture done and it shows that the person has influenza,” she said, adding that there is a flu mimic circulating that is not actually influenza.

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Magazine honors U producer

Kevin Epling, producer and director of photography for MSU’s Division of University Relations, is one of the best in the business. That’s according to AV Video Multimedia Producer magazine, which named Epling one of the Top 100 Producers of 2000.

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COGS holds forum, discusses TAs

Whether to increase the number of teaching assistants or to increase their pay was addressed at a forum hosted by the MSU Council of Graduate Students on Thursday night.“COGS Town Hall - Addressing the Potential Reduction of Teaching Assistantships for the 2001-2002 Academic Year” was held to allow students to voice their concerns and opinions on the issue.“The primary role of COGS is to be an advocate for graduate student concerns,” said Sam Howerton, president of the group.

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Olin offers solutions for finals week stress

While studying for finals, students should try to keep the S-word out of their vocabulary.The word that goes along with cram sessions, caffeine boosts and 12-page papers:Stress.“Give yourself license to take breaks from studying,” said Jon Kermiet, a health educator at Olin Health Center.

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Program combats poverty

The university’s International Studies and Programs is seeking applicants who want to make a positive difference in their homelands.Designed as a graduate studies capstone, the Thoman Fellowship Program prepares students to confront hunger and poverty in their communities.Established in 1982, the program brings together advanced doctoral students from developing countries to address issues locally and back home.“They gain a sense of what it takes to address poverty and hunger,” said Tom Carroll, faculty adviser for the program and a social science professor.Fellows meet weekly as a group throughout the course of the academic year and they also volunteer at local agencies.

CAMPUS

U channel contracts fresh flicks

The Residence Halls Association has made a resolution to reserve the best movies for dorm residents - just in time for the new year.RHA will now obtain movies shown on the University Housing Channel from Swank Motion Pictures, the nation’s leading distributor of licensed movies.

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U professor plays role in high-profile forensics case

Todd Fenton is perfectly comfortable in his laboratory on the fourth floor of Fee Hall, even though he’s surrounded by small fragments of prehistoric remains of teenagers and an intact human skeleton lying on the table next to him.Fenton, a forensic anthropologist and anthropology professor at MSU, works daily to identify the cause of death in cases when it is unknown or when a crime victim’s identity remains a mystery.“My favorites are the ones where you have to figure out the individual death story,” he says.Fenton received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and earned his master’s degree at the University of Arizona in Tucson.He has been working on campus since 1998.“I love forensic anthropology because you can work a case one day and assess the trauma to a body, positively identify the remains and when you go home at night there’s a sense of accomplishment like no other field allows,” he said.Fenton and the rest of the employees at MSU’s forensic anthropology lab have recently been receiving increased statewide and national attention for their hard work and positive results.

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Report card: Michigan higher education is average

Students will not be alone in receiving grades this semester. All 50 states have already been handed their marks for higher education. For the first time, the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education put both public and private universities nationwide to the test, and spent more than two years comparing them. No state received straight As, and many were given low grades.

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Multicultural Center shows students art

Rusty red landscapes adorned with sienna plateaus, bronze mesas and golden sun rays grace the walls of the Multicultural Center these days.Studio art sophomore Domingo Carreon is the creative genius behind 25 paintings and sketches displayed in the Multicultural Center, located in the Union Basement.

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U names holiday card winner

Stacy Rosenthal didn’t imagine her art homework would end up going out to 1,500 people.Rosenthal, a studio art senior, created the winning design for the Kellogg Center’s 8th annual MSU Holiday Card Contest.

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Guest lecture series finishes

Ira Flatow, a veteran National Public Radio science correspondent and Emmy Award-winning television journalist, has covered stories in historic venues like the Kennedy Space Center, Three Mile Island, Antarctica and the South Pole. And it all began during his boyhood when he burned down his mother’s bathroom while trying to recreate a biology class experiment He’ll be bringing his experiences to campus Wednesday as a guest speaker in the McPherson Professorship lecture series. He’s the host of NPR’s “Talk of the Nation: Science Friday,” and Flatow’s lecture will be titled “If it Breeds, It Leads: How the Media Bring Science to the Public.” “He just hops around from physical to natural science and also public issues, like pesticides on tomatoes,” said Douglas Luckie, assistant professor of physiology at Lyman Briggs School. The speech will be the fifth and final of the McPherson Professorship lectures - a series that MSU President M.

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AIDS event celebrates memories, life

The red ribbons adorning campus trees have been taken down and prepared for burial, the memorial quilt panel no longer hangs in the Kresge Art Museum and the lights of Lansing’s holiday tree have been lit once again. But Emily Flowers hopes people won’t forget about the disease behind those events, which caused the death of 10,198 Americans in 1999 alone - AIDS. The nutrition science senior helped coordinate the on-campus projects through Olin Health Center for Friday’s World AIDS Day. Flowers said she’s not sure how many students and community members volunteers reached, but she believes they made a difference. “You can talk about AIDS all you want and try to say the impact of it, but people don’t realize it until they see it in front of them,” Flowers said.