Sunday, June 26, 2022

News | Campus

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Professor earns science award

To MSU Professor James Trosko, cancer research isn’t about winning awards, it’s about helping people.Troskoa professor of pediatrics and human development, will be receiving the 2001 Scientific Achievement Award for his lifetime contributions to the field of science from the Society of Toxicology on Sunday, in San Francisco.“It’s a great feeling knowing that you’ve done something that’s moved the whole field of science,” Trosko said.

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Judicial group allows students to judge peers

MSU students looking to see fellow classmates have a fair court case could find their place with Judicial Affairs. Judicial Affairs, a division of Student Life, is searching for students to fill various positions for the 2001-02 school year. Positions are open to both undergraduate and graduate students of all majors. Duties include judging cases of MSU students and deciding when to put students on probation, change their living arrangements, or suspend them.

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Minority aides to assist Indias earthquake sufferers

Four teams of minority aides will travel throughout South Complex dorms Wednesday to help provide relief to earthquake victims in India. “We’ll be going through all of the dorms, collecting clothing items and pop cans,” said Michael Oden, the complex coordinator for minority aides in South Complex dorms. The students will gather items from 7 p.m.

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ASMSU hopes to draw voters

While ASMSU officials said they are confident the undergraduate student government’s election - which begins today and ends Thursday - will run without a hitch, one concern still remains. “Elections should run smoothly, but voter turnout is the bigger question,” said Nimri Niemchak, ASMSU chief of staff. Students must be undergraduates who have not received a refund on the $13 ASMSU tax to vote in the student government election.

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Cold doesnt stop shamrock racers

Despite early morning temperatures of less than 30 degrees Saturday, more than 200 people gathered at Beaumont Tower to participate in the Shamrock 5K.The run, sponsored by the MSU Tower Guard, Powerhouse Gym, Student Book Store and the Pita Pit, was to benefit the MSU Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities.Tower Guard social chairwoman Kristi Thomassaid because of the large turnout, Tower Guard ran out of numbers and T-shirts toward the end of registration.“We’re so excited, this was such a success,” said Thomas, a zoology sophomore.Amidst the chiming of the carillon and Sparty dancing to motivate the crowd, participants jumped up and down and ran short laps while trying to keep warm before the race began.

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Event highlights global feminist opinions

More than 100 participants celebrated Women’s History Month at “Globalizing Women’s Studies: Feminist Perspectives” on Friday and Saturday at MSU.The conference, sponsored by the Women’s Studies and The Women and International Development programs, served as a kickoff to the new Women and Gender graduate specialization and the graduate specialization in Gender and the Environment.Marjorie Agosin, a professor at Wellesley College, spoke Friday night at the Kellogg Center Auditorium.

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Study drums for healthier living

MSU graduate student Carolyn Koebel is using drums to study good health for her master’s thesis. Her wellness study, titled “The Effects of Group Drumming on Selected Neuroendocrine Levels and Self-Reported Mood, Stress, Socialization and Journeying Experiences,” kicks off from 7 p.m.

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U searches to uncover animals healing power

Animals can make a person’s face light up with joy, but they may also have the power to send blood pressure and stress levels down.Some MSU faculty and community members believe there’s more to learn about the human-animal link and they have joined to form the Human Animal Bond Initiative - an effort to uncover the hidden healing powers of animals.“The overall goal is to scientifically validate the importance of animals in the health and well-being of people and families,” said Lana Kaiser, a professor of nursing who is leading the project.

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U researches Alzheimers

Some of MSU’s best scientists are working to gain some insight into why Alzheimer’s disease affects so many Americans.Dr. Daniel Murman, an assistant professor of neurology and opthamology, is involved with two projects on campus looking at different factors which contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.“Alzheimer’s is a very common degenerative disease of the brain where certain groups of nerve cells die,” Murman said.

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Speaker discusses politics at heritage month kickoff

To Mike Kueh, hearing Shamina Singh speak was an amazing opportunity.Singh, former executive director of the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, addressed an informal group of about 30 students, including Kueh, on Saturday night in McDonel Hall at the kickoff for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.Kueh, a telecommunication senior, said Singh’s address was a good way to get insight on how politics play a role in his community.“I think it just makes us better aware of where Asian Americans stand in the United States,” he said.Representation, unity and solidarity were all among issues addressed at the event, which was sponsored by the Coalition of Indian Undergraduate Students, the Asian and Pacific American Student Organization and the Residence Halls Association.Established by an executive order of former President Clinton in 1999, the initiative Singh worked in aimed to improve the quality of life of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders through increased participation in federal programs where they could be underserved, such as health, human services, education and labor.Singh said to her, the initiative was a promise against hate crimes and discrimination, and for due process and prosperity in the United States.“The signing of this executive order opened a door for our community,” she said.Throughout her speech Singh stressed giving Asian Americans a louder voice.“I think it’s time that we stand up,” she said.

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Global gender issues focus of conference

As part of Women’s History Month, three speakers will be on campus this weekend to discuss international gender issues.The conference, “Globalizing Women’s Studies: Feminist Perspectives,” kicks off today at 7 p.m.

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Child enjoys fame on side of pop bottle

David and Becki Beaudoin have a new keepsake to remember their son’s childhood - that is, if he doesn’t drink it first. The couple recently received 12 bottles of Jones Cream Soda in the mail, complete with their 2-year-old son, Austin’s, pictures on the labels. The photograph helped them win a contest through Jones Soda Co., which is known for its wacky photo labels. They entered the contest last October at Union Central, a convenience store in the Union.

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Pageant candidate strives to be an average guy

This is the last in a five-part series profiling the contestants of the Mr. Black MSU pageant. Maurice Turner thinks Mr. Black MSU should be less of a role model and more of an everyday man. “I got involved because I wanted to see a more well-rounded individual at least go out for the title and try to attain it,” the human resources and society senior said. The Mr. Black MSU pageant, sponsored by the Black Student Alliance, profiles black male undergraduates who stand out academically through their student leadership on and off campus. Marketing senior DeAndre Carter, founder and president of DCI Motivational Services, a motivational speaking business, was crowned the first Mr. Black MSU last year. In addition to being secretary of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and a member of BSA, Turner also helps out at the Boys and Girls Club of Lansing, mentors two students at Everett High School, 3900 Stabler St., in Lansing and works with the Urban League in his hometown of Flint. BSA President Tonya Upthegrove said the title of Mr. Black MSU gives recognition to the unsung heroes of the black student community. “We put on this pageant to promote black male leadership and to honor those students who play an active role in the community, have achieved academic excellence and who represent the black community in their everyday actions,” the communication senior said. LaKesha Rawls, president of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. - Turner’s sister sorority - said Turner’s community service involvement at MSU, in the Lansing area and at home makes him “more than qualified” to become this year’s Mr. Black MSU. “He’s very caring and very concerned about the black community,” the political science senior said.

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Professor excelled despite struggles

Mary Cookingham lived her life with dignity, grace and quiet strength. Cookingham, the first woman to receive tenure from the MSU Department of Economics, died of complications from multiple sclerosis Monday.

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ASMSU supports groups use of recycled paper

ASMSU is looking to change its environment - indoors and outdoors.The undergraduate student government plans to support ECO, an MSU student environmental group, in efforts to convince the university to use 100 percent recycled paper.ASMSU’s Academic Assembly recently passed a bill, composed by ECO, stating the undergraduate student government will purchase only chlorine-free, 100 percent recycled paper for official usage.And ASMSU representatives hope MSU will do the same.“We want to be as conservative as possible, that’s the message we want to send out,” said Marcia Short, ASMSU Academic Assembly vice chairperson for internal affairs.

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U administration pleased with virtual AP coursework

MSU is helping high school seniors advance toward college by providing a new link - Internet courses.Last semester MSU’s Virtual University began offering Advanced Placement courses to high school seniors in Michigan.The courses are administered through the Internet and are coordinated by MSU professors.