Saturday, February 4, 2023

News | Campus

CAMPUS

Llamafest fun, entertaining

The difference between a llama and a camel is obvious - a hump. But that’s not the only difference those who attended Llamafest 2001 may have discovered.The event, which was held Saturday and Sunday at the Pavilion for Agriculture and Livestock Education, gave attendees a closer look at the animals.More than 200 llamas were on display for the public to view and learn about.The event also gave owners a chance to display their llamas, sell them and give the public an appreciation for the diverse animal.“It’s like going to the zoo, kids love it,” said Bob Macauley who runs Paradise Ranch, a llama farm in Mecosta, Mich.Macauley and his wife, Deb, first became interested in the animals when they saw them in a parade about 10 years ago.

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Survey: freshmen volunteering more than in past years

A recent survey showed the percentage of college freshmen who volunteer has steadily increased since 1990, and volunteer leaders say MSU has been no different.The survey, which was conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles, showed the percentage of freshmen who performed volunteer work in 2000 increased 15 percent since 1990.

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VOX using voices to increase awareness

A new student group, VOX, which is Latin for “voices,” is planning to educate students about reproductive health. “We hope to spread awareness and to get people politically active,” said Kathryn Paquette, co-director of the group.

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Live miracles wow fair crowds

Detroit - Screams from nearby carnival rides and smells of cotton candy gave way to wide-eyed youngsters witnessing more than 400 live animal births at the Miracle of Life exhibit at the Michigan State Fair during the last two weeks. MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine staffed and sponsored the Miracle of Life exhibit for the eighth year in a row. Calves, lambs, piglets and poultry are born and spend the first days of their lives under the big white tent, just off the midway. Kaylene Cipolla was one of roughly 500 people at the exhibit Monday, the fair’s final day.

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ASMSU fights for future of program

One of the best visually impaired programs in the nation was placed under a moratorium, and ASMSU representatives are fighting to keep it running.In June, the College of Education’s visual impairment program, which includes hearing and mental disabilities, was put on a year long hiatus while university officials review the program.The freeze on the program was preceded by the resignation of one of its leaders, Susan Bruce, an assistant professor of counseling educational psychology & special education for nine years.

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History professor fondly remembered by students, colleagues

An MSU history professor and avid skydiver, David Walker, died earlier this summer in a sky diving accident.Peter Beattie, a fellow Latin American historian at MSU, said Walker was born in Louisiana but spent much of his life in Texas.“David was a real character,” said Beattie, an associate history professor.

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Llamas invade campus for Labor Day

What animal is an ideal backyard companion, requires little maintenance and doesn’t smell or make annoying noises? They’re llamas, and they’re invading campus this weekend. Up to 200 of the cute creatures can be seen at Llamafest, set for 8 a.m.

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Increase helps professors pay remain competitive

The university’s academic staff will notice an increase in their pay checks this October, but reactions amongst the faculty are mixed as to whether the increase will move MSU’s historically underpaid professors up the Big Ten’s salary scale.MSU ranked last in the Big Ten in average salary during the last school year, the Office of Planning and Budgets said.This year, the university increased salaries by 5 percent for the third year in a row, despite a lower than expected state appropriation.And MSU President M.

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Trees: tailgaters dont tread on me

The grass in Spartan Stadium will be growing green next fall, but after football season, the soil all over the rest of campus could be as hard as concrete.To prevent the demise of campus greenery, MSU officials are prohibiting parking on any grass surface north of the Red Cedar River, leaving parking areas on south campus designated for gamegoers.“Over six football games a year, and especially when it’s wet, it would continue to cause the trees to go into a decline,” said Paul Swartz, the campus arborist in charge of tree maintenance.

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Financial aid takes to Web; New system goes paper-free

Financial aid applicants no longer have to sign, seal and deliver their forms. Seeking assistance is as simple as a click away. Students have used the Internet for several months, but for the first time, the entire system is paperless, said Keith Williams, assistant director of the Office of Financial Aid. “From the beginning to the end, students can complete the financial aid process,” he said.

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Disease threatens U.S. blood supply; increase in donations needed from U

Mad Cow disease is expected to take a toll on blood donations this year, and the American Red Cross is asking for students’ help.Following the outbreaks of the disease in Europe, a blood shortage is expected because of precautions to prevent the disease from spreading into the United States.“We will lose between six-to-eight percent this year because people who have traveled to the UK could have come in contact with the Mad Cow disease and not know it,” said Carol Lovelady, a donor recruitment representative for MSU with the American Red Cross, 1800 E.

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Researchers seek to grow tougher fibers

The search to find environmentally-friendly solutions for the diminishing oil supply and increasing oil consumption in the United States may end right on MSU’s campus.MSU researchers are trying to find ways to make tough and versatile materials that can be fabricated into items such as automotive parts and a variety of plastics - all from plants and agricultural products.

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Freshmen: better than rest of U

Student enrollment numbers may not have increased much from last year, but the academic talents may have.Although exact numbers won’t be available until a quarter of the way through the first semester, more than 6,800 students have enrolled at MSU, and the grade-point averages and ACT scores were at an all-time high.“This is academically the strongest group we’ve ever had,” said Director of Admissions Gordon Stanley.According to statistics, the average freshmen GPA is 3.5 or higher, and the average ACT score was 24.

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Incident prompts safety awareness

When Joseph Clark locks the door to his Williams Hall room at night, he wouldn’t be afraid.The journalism sophomore said although he was surprised to hear about two instances of criminal sexual conduct in his residence hall, he’s not worried.“I don’t lie awake at night scared,” he said.

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RHA still committed to goals, serving U

It’s a new semester and that means new faces, goals and attitudes for MSU’s Residence Halls Association’s executive board. The university’s RHA is the largest residence hall association in the country and the second largest student organization on campus behind ASMSU, the university’s undergraduate student government. Jeff Donofrio, the new director of public relations for RHA, said its main goal is to address the concerns and to be the voice for more than 14,000 undergraduate students throughout the 20 residence halls on campus.