Saturday, February 4, 2023

News | Campus

CAMPUS

Lecture series features former U.N. ambassador

MSU will celebrate the United Nations’ 56-year anniversary tonight by presenting the first of four World View speakers - Richard Holbrooke. Holbrooke is regarded as one of the most accomplished American diplomats and negotiators of our time and as a former U.N.

CAMPUS

ASMSU to create book exchange for students

Many students complain about the price of book at bookstores - and MSU’s undergraduate government is trying to help. ASMSU’s Academic Assembly passed two bills Tuesday that could alleviate the cost of textbooks by setting up a book exchange program through its Web site. The site will be a free exchange of books to all students - similar to a message board where students can set their own prices. Jared English, representative for James Madison College, introduced the bills and said the bills call for the Webmaster to keep the site updated and for the director of public relations to publicize the new Web Site. The bill took awhile to finalize because ASMSU had to make sure they weren’t breaking any laws, he said. “The university wanted to make sure we talk to our lawyers about the legalese before we went ahead with it,” English said. The international relations sophomore said it will be up to the students to make this site work and he’s hoping to have the book exchange fully operational before finals. “I hope students take the time to do it, it requires them to take the initiative,” he said. Many MSU students said they’re interested in what ASMSU’s Web site has to offer. Mike Barker, an English sophomore, said he spent almost $500 on books this semester.

CAMPUS

Group sheds light on learning disorders

Elaine Womboldt knows firsthand the struggle of dealing with a learning disability.She has two children who have experienced such disorders, prompting her to create Lansing’s Learning Disabilities Families & Friends, Inc. in 1989, a resource center to help combat the problems that go along with learning disabilities.These problems can include dyslexia, a lack of spelling and reading comprehension and difficulty with mathematics.“I saw that there was a need for the family to work with kids and as a family unit for success,” Womboldt said.

CAMPUS

Orthodox leader to speak on self-governing church

A leader of the earliest church in history will give a presentation about Orthodox unity tomorrow. Archbishop Nathaniel of the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America will speak about the need for an Autocephalous American Orthodox Church - a separate, self-governing church. MSU’s Orthodox Christian Fellowship and the Orthodox Christian Women of Mid Michigan are bringing the archbishop to campus to speak about the Canon Law required by the Orthodoxy in America, which would create the self-governing church. The law is supposed to create one jurisdiction in America, but it is not enforced, said Janet Peters, president of the Orthodox Christian Women of Mid Michigan.

CAMPUS

ASMSU uses business cards to teach students their rights

Students do have rights, believe it or not. ASMSU/COGS Student Legal Services, Academic Assembly and Student Assembly are working on letting students know what rights they have anytime they want to know. These groups within MSU’s undergraduate student government are working to make business cards that list some of their basic rights. Aaron Kelly, director of legal services, said he got the idea at an Associated Big Ten Schools conference meeting last summer.

CAMPUS

Students for Life bring graphic exhibit to U

Students coming to and from classes in Wells Hall on Monday received a stern warning of the images they were about to witness. However the orange signs reading, “Warning Genocide Pictures Ahead” placed in the courtyard behind Wells Hall and the International Center could do little to prepare them. The Genocide Awareness Project, organized by MSU Students for Life and the Center for Bio-Ethical Reform, came to campus armed with photographs depicting the remains of aborted fetuses side by side with historical examples of genocide.

CAMPUS

Scarves a symbol of Muslim support

As a symbol of solidarity for Muslims who have been harassed since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, women who are not of the faith have been wearing hijabs, headscarves, to demonstrate support for the community. The scarves are considered to be a religious display of modesty and intellect and are worn by Muslim women in a fashion that covers their hair. The trend has been created in response to a worldwide campaign, “Scarves for Solidarity,” which has held events in Australia, England, Illinois, California, Washington, D.C.

CAMPUS

Sessions to address 9-11 attacks

The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks have sparked a lot of debate - and a series of discussions will encourage students to voice their opinions further.The first of three sessions to explore national issues while facilitating discussion about the attacks will be held Tuesday.This all-university symposium will give faculty the opportunity to present information about the topic and allow people to express their opinions afterward.The first symposium, “Responding to Terrorism: Are We At War?

CAMPUS

International Center to expand

A dream for an improved International Center is starting to become reality for Delia Koo.The addition of a third floor to the center is set to begin in the coming months and preparations, including building a temporary loading dock, are underway.Last fall, Koo donated an undisclosed amount to fund the project and the MSU Board of Trustees later announced the center’s academic wing will be renamed the Delia Koo International Academic Center.Koo, who received her master’s from MSU in 1954, said the idea originated when the Volunteer English Tutoring Program, which until recently she was coordinator for, needed more space.“It will provide a nice place for all international students and scholars to stop and realize that Michigan State University is interested in helping them.” Koo said.

CAMPUS

Formula race team appreciates sponsors

Taking turns at high speeds while adrenaline rushes through the driver’s body and wind rushes over his or her head. This is how sponsors of MSU’s Formula SAE (Society for Automotive Engineering) Race Team described their experiences on a makeshift track Saturday at Lot 89, the commuter lot. The team wanted to recognize those who make the design and construction of the car possible. “This is a day to show appreciation to the businesses, faculty and parents that help us out,” said Matt Palomaki, team project manager and mechanical engineering senior. Palomaki is one of about 40 MSU students who design, manufacture and race against 135 teams from all over the world every May at the Pontiac Silverdome. “We’ll finish up our final design the first of November, start manufacturing after that and finish by the beginning of May,” Palomaki said. Last year, the team finished 25th overall, but came in second place in a category based on design and marketing.

CAMPUS

Volunteers head to streets

More than 150 students, some armed with rakes and hoes and all with hands and a heart, took to the streets Saturday to volunteer in the Greater Lansing area.MSU and LCC students took part in the annual Into the Street Kick-Off by giving four hours out of their day to provide different services at more than 20 locations.This year’s theme, “United We Stand with Helping Hands,” was dedicated to the Sept.

CAMPUS

Greeks soccer tournament benefits Make-A-Wish

Chi Omega and Delta Sigma Pi will host a benefit soccer tournament Sunday to Make-A-Wish for Karen King. The second annual Karen King Kickoff soccer tournament will raise money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation in honor of King, an MSU student who was killed in January 1997. King was sexually assaulted and killed after being abducted outside a store in Saginaw. Two men were convicted of first-degree murder, first-degree criminal sexual conduct, carjacking, armed robbery, kidnapping and possession of a firearm.

CAMPUS

Union mural lacks minorities, sparks debate

Students heading downstairs to the cafeteria and Multicultural Center in the Union are greeted by a mural of 12 faculty members - only one of whom is a minority.And the Council of Racial and Ethnic Students, which consists of executive board members from Black Student Alliance, Culturas de las Razas Unidas, Asian Pacific American Student Organization and North American Indian Student Organization, isn’t happy with the display.The 55-foot mural was painted in April 2001 by Okemos artist Lori Lechler as part of a project to create a theme for the cafeteria, with a different mural on each of four walls.The mural, however, is adjacent to the Multicultural Center’s entrance.Like many other CORES members, Nasbah Hill, co-president of NAISO, said the wall should depict the essence of the center.“It wasn’t right to put it up without contacting representatives from the CORES groups to let us know what’s going on,” the psychology sophomore said.

CAMPUS

Stroke patient care assessed through 1-year CDC grant

MSU has received a grant of nearly $1 million from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to participate in an effort to assess treatment and care of stroke. The one-year grant, which is one of four given out by CDC, will fund the Michigan Acute Stroke Care Overview & Treatment Surveillance System, a pilot program to survey stroke victims in Michigan and how they are treated. The other three grants will go to universities in Ohio, Massachusetts and Georgia. Nigel Paneth, chairperson of the Department of Epidemiology, said the Michigan program is not only an MSU project - it’s a joint effort with the University of Michigan and Wayne State University. “This is a really big deal for not only us - but the entire state of Michigan,” he said.