Thursday, June 30, 2022

News | Campus

CAMPUS

Bikes left behind can get U around

Students might notice them sitting locked up next to buildings and fences on campus.Rust might have started to cover the bars, a wheel might be bent or a flat tire might be hugging the ground.These are the bikes that get left behind by students.

CAMPUS

Office helps foreign students find their place at U

Vikas Menon, a computer engineering sophomore, left his life in India with a suitcase in pursuit of a college degree at MSU.A year later, Menon is welcoming students from around the world to Spartan country.“I was excited, but I wondered if people would accept me,” he said of his first days in East Lansing.Menon said a week of orientation programs through the Office for International Students and Scholars prepared him for college life.“After having left home for the first time I was homesick, and I met friends in the same situation,” Menon said.

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ASMSU asks for student-city liaison

One week after two recent MSU graduates failed to pass through the primary election for the East Lansing City Council, ASMSU’s Academic Assembly has introduced a joint resolution it says will improve relations between students and the city council.The resolution, which must be approved by both assemblies of the undergraduate student government, calls for the creation of a joint committee to act as a liaison between the city and students.“It’s very vague right now,” Academic Assembly Chairperson Matt Clayson said.

CAMPUS

U official receives promotion in federal relations

Howard Gobstein lives in the same house and works in the same office, but things have changed.After six years as assistant vice president and director of federal relations for MSU, he has been promoted to associate vice president for governmental affairs.“I’m still the director of the Washington, D.C., office, but I’ve become increasingly busy,” Gobstein said.

CAMPUS

Expert discusses benefits of olive oil

Got olive oil?About 20 people at least got information on it Tuesday while listening to visiting scholar Apostolos Kiritsakis’ seminar about the oil’s benefits.Kiritsakis, who has a doctorate in food science from MSU, talked about the history, processing, product quality, packaging and nutritional and health aspects of olive oil during “Olive Oil from Tree to Table,” at the School of Packaging.Kiritsakis has been studying olive oil since 1972, and is currently working on an olive oil project in the school with Rueben Hernandez, a professor of food packaging.

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Aides tour research facilities

U.S. congressional representatives for Michigan legislators made their way to MSU to tour the university and its research facilities.The group wrapped up a three-day tour of Michigan research universities.

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Camera improves cancer detection

For $400, the average gadget guru can buy a digital camera suitable for holiday snapshots and family portraits.For around $400,000, MSU’s Department of Radiology bought a digital camera made to save lives.The camera is actually a digital mammography unit, which allows doctors to take a snapshot of all areas of the breast.“You record images and download them,” said Arlene Sierra, director of clinical services for the department.

CAMPUS

Energy usage surges to record level with heat

Staying cool takes more than just a good pair of sunglasses and a leather jacket.It takes energy.Electricity use jumped recently as Michigan residents battled summer heat with fans and air conditioners.Jackson-based Consumers Energy set a record for power usage with 7,780 megawatts from 2 p.m.

CAMPUS

Classic car show to raise funds for charity

Classic cars are going to make MSU’s campus a safer place this weekend. Cars on Campus and the MSU Alumni Association are sponsoring a weekend of charity events to benefit MSU Safe Place and Highfields Inc. MSU Safe Place works to help those who experience domestic violence within the MSU community.

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Legislators offer solutions to tuition hike criticisms

It’s been more than two weeks since Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus sent a questioning letter about tuition increases to university presidents around the state.In response, many of the presidents have called or written with arguments for their increases.“Everyone has a different answer,” Posthumus said.

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Professor heads pop culture association

It was 1962 when the Main Library decided to expand its collection beyond agricultural studies and Shakespeare.Nearly 40 years later, more than 250,000 popular culture pieces rest in the library’s growing Special Collections - and pop culture studies at MSU keep growing.Gary Hoppenstand, an American Thought and Language professor and associate department chairman, was elected president of the Popular Culture Association, a 3,000-member organization dedicated to the scholarly study of pop culture of all kinds.“It entails quite a bit,” Hoppenstand said.

CAMPUS

Glass art exhibit heats up gallery

On a hot Sunday afternoon, people were doing their best to stay out of the 90-degree heat. But some stopped to watch a man play with 2,000-degree molten glass anyway.Art Allison, from Pottsboro, Texas, was demonstrating the art of glassblowing to spectators outside of Mackerel Sky, 217 Ann St.“I’ve been doing this for 22 years now and this is what I like to do,” Allison said.Allison was in East Lansing for a demonstration that was part of the First Sunday Gallery Walk, which is a coalition of East Lansing and Lansing galleries that hold exhibitions for the public on the first Sunday of every other month.Allison started working with glass while a student at Kent State University in 1979, and since then has made a living out of it.“All it is is just blowing a bubble and then decorating it,” he said.

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Camp bridges technology gap

Michigan area middle-schoolers have been trying their hands at new technology during the third annual Kids Learning In Computer Klubhouses, or KLICK, Leadership Camp, held on MSU’s campus this week. The KLICK program is an after-school program designed to teach middle-schoolers of low economic backgrounds or communities how to use new technology.

CAMPUS

Kids enjoy art at 4-H garden

Soaked from head to toe, 4-year-old Mason resident Adrienne Hough grinned from cheek to cheek.“I like the frogs,” Hough said, as she danced under the squirts of water coming from cement frogs, one of the features in the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden.Hough was one of about 50 children who enjoyed art under the hot sun during the garden’s “Art Day.”Mason resident Karen Krepps said she took the morning off from work to spend the day with her grandchildren, Jacob and Faith Krepps.“It’s great,” the elder Krepps said.