Wednesday, August 5, 2020

Michigan State College of Law to fully integrate with university

July 31, 2020
“The Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy 1215 -2015” by The American Bar Association in conjunction with the U.S. Library of Congress is displayed in the College of Law on Feb. 12, 2019.
“The Magna Carta: Enduring Legacy 1215 -2015” by The American Bar Association in conjunction with the U.S. Library of Congress is displayed in the College of Law on Feb. 12, 2019. —
Photo by Annie Barker | The State News

The Michigan State University College of Law will now be fully integrated into MSU, according to an email from Acting Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Thomas D. Jeitschko. The integration is expected to be completed by Aug. 17.

"This is an exciting time for the future of legal education at MSU, and for our broader campus community," Jeitschko said. "We look forward to expanding the range of educational opportunities at MSU, and to welcoming the College of Law and its students as we take our final steps toward full integration."

According to the College of Law website, leaders of the university and the College of Law decided to pursue full integration in 2018.

College of Law students currently have “lifelong education status” at MSU, but a few changes will come with the full integration.

Law students who are Michigan residents will now qualify for in-state tuition, which totals $41,040, compared to the out-of-state $45,600 total.

The integration will not change daily aspects of the experience of College of Law students, and they can enjoy the privileges they already have as MSU students. 

Some of the privileges mentioned in the email include being subject to policies such as the University Policy on Relationship Violence and Sexual Misconduct; being full participants in MSU’s student governance processes; and having access to services provided by MSU’s Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities, Office for International Students and Scholars, and Office of Institutional Equity.

Per requirements from the U.S. Department of Education, students were also notified that once the integration is complete, the College of Law will become a campus of MSU, a different institution. It will be considered an “additional location” of MSU under the rules of the Department of Education.

Students also have the option to not continue their classes at MSU. If they choose to not continue in the College of Law or MSU, they should provide written notice to John D. Gaboury, MSU associate provost for academic services.

Those with concerns regarding the operations of the college should contact Gaboury or the Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid Feedback System if their concerns are not adequately addressed.

Until the full integration is complete, the College of Law is led by a Board of Trustees, one-third of which was appointed by MSU’s Board of Trustees. The president of the university serves as the president of the Law College, and the provost of MSU serves as provost of the Law College.

The Law College’s academic policies are aligned with the university, and the dean represents the Law College whenever MSU deans gather. Faculty serve on university committees, curricular changes move through the university’s academic systems and MSU law students are represented on the Council of Graduate Students, or COGS.

The Law College was founded in 1891 as the Detroit College of Law, or DCL, and affiliated with MSU in 1995, according to their website.

This article has been updated with the correct tuition amounts for both in-state and out-of-state students.

Discussion

Share and discuss “Michigan State College of Law to fully integrate with university” on social media.